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Your expert contribution to our research communication project helps us disseminate valuable support to researchers worldwide.

General guidance

We welcome all science communicators to share articles with us.
Your submission should be between 700-1500 words. 
We don’t accept anonymous submissions. 
Articles will be made available on search engines and promoted through our social media. 
Subheadings are recommended to avoid large chunks of text. 
Please embed any references to accessible open sources within the text itself as links (no bibliography/reference list is needed).

After your submission

Our editorial team will provide feedback on your article to ensure that it meets our high standards before publishing. We may request changes to your article and we aim to give you any feedback within two weeks.

Please note that we reserve the right to reject article submissions at our discretion, but we will usually seek to offer corrections rather than reject an article outright. There are a variety of reasons why we may reject an article, but we’ll do our best to work with you to ensure high quality submissions.

'Dissminate' Article Submission Policy

We periodically update our ‘Disseminate’ Article Submission Policy, which you can find here. Please make sure to check for any updates when you visit our site. You should also read our site’s Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy along with this Submission Policy.

Articles submitted to The PhD Place remain the sole copyright of the respective author(s). The “Author” is the person who submits the article using the form below.

The Author holds full rights to commercially reproduce their submitted content.

When you submit an article, you’ll need to provide your name, a short biography, university, and author picture which will be published alongside your article. We don’t accept anonymous submissions.

Articles should be written in accessible, natural language and must be inclusive. They must not contain defamatory, profane, obscene, or illegal material. Articles also must not contain slanderous or libellous content. You’re responsible for ensuring your work and any information provided doesn’t violate intellectual property rights.

The PhD Place acts under the author’s instructions and isn’t obligated to check or confirm the legal use of reproducing any content. The Author indemnifies and defends The PhD Place Ltd for any claims made as a result of alleged infringements.

You’re submitting your article on a voluntary basis without compensation or future payment of royalties. In no event shall The PhD Place Ltd be liable for any special, incidental, indirect, or consequential damages whatsoever arising out of or in connection with the publishing of an author’s article.

You release The PhD Place Ltd and any representatives, employees, managers, members, officers, parent companies, subsidiaries, and directors from all claims and demands arising out of or in connection with any use of the information submitted, including, without limitation, all claims for invasion of privacy, infringement on your right of publicity, defamation, and any other personal and/or property rights.

If you mention specific academics or organizations in your article, such as supervisors, sponsors/funders, friends, groups, societies, or clubs, you need to confirm that you have their explicit consent to publish their name on The PhD Place within the context of the article.

We review all content and may remove it at any time without prior notice. We’ll never add any information to your article or bio without your permission. You can edit or delete your articles and author information from the live website at any time upon written request.

We may occasionally need to remove a submission from The PhD Place along with any associated author information. By submitting your article, you give permission for The PhD Place Ltd to share it and your author information (name, picture, and/or social media link) on our social media pages and other pages of the website, such as the Home page.

Contact us

If you require assistance or have inquiries regarding our Disseminate! platform, you can get in touch with us by using our contact form. We will gladly assist you with your concerns.

Submit your article

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Spare Me the Lecture: A Short Guide On How to Excel In Your First Teaching Role

If you are reading this, it is assumed that you are about to embark on an exciting new journey in teaching at university level. Congratulations! You are about to enter a highly rewarding area of academia where each day is different and full of opportunity to inspire those around you. This blogpost goes through five key considerations to help you prepare for success before entering the classroom.

Academic Job Interviews: 5 Questions You Should Be Ready For

Regardless of your PhD stage, you can help your future self by getting interview-ready now. This article goes through five interview questions based on your research that are commonly asked at academic job interviews, with advice on what you can do now during your time as a PhD student to be more prepared in the future!

90 and Thriving: Dr Bronwyn Herbert’s Later-in-Life PhD Kept Her Feeling Younger

At ninety years old, Dr Bronwyn Herbert has completed her PhD at the University of Queensland, Australia. The PhD Place had the pleasure of interviewing her across the globe to share her inspiring story with our readers! Drawing on her extensive career in social work and her wealth of life experience, Bronwyn promotes the joy of lifelong learning and showcases the power of resilience that every PhD student can seek to emulate.

PhD Abroad: How to Navigate Intercultural Interactions 

Are you studying for a PhD abroad? Are you worried about integrating meaningfully into your PhD life in a different country? In this article, Dai Wenqi explores how to socialise and adapt to a new culture during your PhD abroad, providing advice from her lived experiences to help you enjoy your doctoral life to the fullest. This includes respecting and engaging with the culture of your host country, learning the language (but forgo the pressure of perfect fluency), and leaning into your unique personal charm.

Death by a Thousand Semesters: Are Academic Careers as All-Consuming as People Say?

The stress and all-consuming nature of pursuing an academic career is often detailed in social media posts and anecdotal tales. Whilst it is useful for PhD students to understand the perils of careers in academia, this article provides further context for some of the issues surrounding progression in the academic profession. It runs through five factors that impact on how all-consuming academic careers can be, ultimately advising you to progress in academia at your own pace.

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