Search
Close this search box.

Your expert contribution to our research communication project helps us disseminate valuable support to researchers worldwide.

General guidance

We welcome all science communicators to share articles with us.
Your submission should be between 700-1500 words. 
We don’t accept anonymous submissions. 
Articles will be made available on search engines and promoted through our social media. 
Subheadings are recommended to avoid large chunks of text. 
Please embed any references to accessible open sources within the text itself as links (no bibliography/reference list is needed).

After your submission

Our editorial team will provide feedback on your article to ensure that it meets our high standards before publishing. We may request changes to your article and we aim to give you any feedback within two weeks.

Please note that we reserve the right to reject article submissions at our discretion, but we will usually seek to offer corrections rather than reject an article outright. There are a variety of reasons why we may reject an article, but we’ll do our best to work with you to ensure high quality submissions.

'Dissminate' Article Submission Policy

We periodically update our ‘Disseminate’ Article Submission Policy, which you can find here. Please make sure to check for any updates when you visit our site. You should also read our site’s Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy along with this Submission Policy.

Articles submitted to The PhD Place remain the sole copyright of the respective author(s). The “Author” is the person who submits the article using the form below.

The Author holds full rights to commercially reproduce their submitted content.

When you submit an article, you’ll need to provide your name, a short biography, university, and author picture which will be published alongside your article. We don’t accept anonymous submissions.

Articles should be written in accessible, natural language and must be inclusive. They must not contain defamatory, profane, obscene, or illegal material. Articles also must not contain slanderous or libellous content. You’re responsible for ensuring your work and any information provided doesn’t violate intellectual property rights.

The PhD Place acts under the author’s instructions and isn’t obligated to check or confirm the legal use of reproducing any content. The Author indemnifies and defends The PhD Place Ltd for any claims made as a result of alleged infringements.

You’re submitting your article on a voluntary basis without compensation or future payment of royalties. In no event shall The PhD Place Ltd be liable for any special, incidental, indirect, or consequential damages whatsoever arising out of or in connection with the publishing of an author’s article.

You release The PhD Place Ltd and any representatives, employees, managers, members, officers, parent companies, subsidiaries, and directors from all claims and demands arising out of or in connection with any use of the information submitted, including, without limitation, all claims for invasion of privacy, infringement on your right of publicity, defamation, and any other personal and/or property rights.

If you mention specific academics or organizations in your article, such as supervisors, sponsors/funders, friends, groups, societies, or clubs, you need to confirm that you have their explicit consent to publish their name on The PhD Place within the context of the article.

We review all content and may remove it at any time without prior notice. We’ll never add any information to your article or bio without your permission. You can edit or delete your articles and author information from the live website at any time upon written request.

We may occasionally need to remove a submission from The PhD Place along with any associated author information. By submitting your article, you give permission for The PhD Place Ltd to share it and your author information (name, picture, and/or social media link) on our social media pages and other pages of the website, such as the Home page.

Contact us

If you require assistance or have inquiries regarding our Disseminate! platform, you can get in touch with us by using our contact form. We will gladly assist you with your concerns.

Submit your article

* indicates a required field.

Applying for a PhD Abroad: How to Thrive as an International Student

Are you applying for a PhD program in a new country and feeling overwhelmed? This article offers some top tips on how to successfully navigate the international waters to help yourself thrive abroad! Important considerations include researching the right country/university fit for you, giving plenty of time to getting a residence permit, and helping yourself feel part of a community in your new city.

Supporting Your Wellbeing as an Autistic Postgraduate Researcher 

Nurturing your wellbeing is a crucial part of the PhD. This article is packed with wisdom and insights on supporting (and advocating for) your own wellbeing during the PhD journey, from an autistic perspective. It emphasises the need to remind yourself of the wider picture and embrace the ups and downs of the PhD journey.

Realising I Have ADHD During My PhD: A Hidden Battle

This article details the experience of a Professional Doctorate student (and full-time working parent) suddenly becoming aware that she has ADHD – being given a new, neurodivergent lens through which to see herself, and the additional challenges (and solutions) that it brings to a PhD journey. The article offers solutions for coping with a neurodivergent brain in a world generally designed for neurotypical ways of functioning.

Applying for a PhD: My Struggles and Triumphs

This article explores the challenges, doubts and pressures faced during the pursuit of a PhD. It takes a close look at how PhD candidates are chosen, highlighting the need for looking into the scientific character of the candidate and their way of thinking rather than just focusing on academic achievements alone. The narrative also highlights coping strategies, advocating for resilience and self-reflection. Ultimately, it offers motivation to others, encouraging them to persevere in their pursuit of knowledge and passion in the face of adversity.

How Generation Z Can Thrive in a PhD

This insightful article highlights how young Gen Z academics can make the most of their unique skills and attributes cultivated by their generational upbringing, and propel themselves towards achieving triumph in their PhD programme and beyond.

How to Handle the Jump Straight from Undergrad to PhD 

Are you considering going straight from an undergraduate degree to a PhD, skipping the master’s? At 22 years old, Tess shares her experience of this and provides some valuable insights about how she prepared and applied for her PhD in Computing without doing a master’s degree.

Update cookies preferences